Ohio Bed Bug Laws

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Ohio Bed Bug Laws

Ohio bed bug laws have been on the books for awhile, but unfortunately for renters and landlords it’s a bit of a “no man’s land”. With the recent rise in bed bug infestations, additional laws have been passed by many other states addressing this pest.

Twenty-two states currently have laws addressing bed bugs in rental properties, hotels, institutional facilities and schools. Unfortunately, Ohio has not caught up with the trend.

Ohio’s only bed bug law was passed in 1992 to address infestations in hotels, motels and Single Room Occupancies (SROs) (see ORC 3741.13). This has nothing to do with tenant / landlord law.

 

Ohio Bed Bug Laws and Landlord Tenant Law

Ohio landlord tenant law does not include specifics in regards to bed bugs and other insect infestations. However, as a renter, you do have the right to reside in fit and habitable conditions.  Alternatively, your landlord also has the right to protect him or herself in the event that a tenant brings beds bugs in to a rental.

Here is what to do if you rent and find bed bugs

  1. Contact your landlord immediately
  2. Do NOT disturb anything
  3. Close off the area (if possible) that you found evidence or bed bugs
  4. Do NOT treat with any DIY treatments

Once a landlord is notified by a tenant of a bed bug infestation, and it is deemed the tenant did not bring in the bed bugs –  the landlord is then typically responsible for hiring someone and treating the infestation. Many landlords will also inspect and treat adjacent units and shared common areas.

This is commonly seen if you have just moved in to your apartment or rental home, or if a neighboring unit has had a long standing issue with bed bugs. The landlord may also be aware of a previous bed bug issue in the unit, in which case him or her would be responsible to cover the issue.

Alternatively, if the bed bugs are deemed to have come in as a result of the renter (family member or friend has bed bugs, place of work has bed bugs, etc) then the renter is typically responsible for treatment.

It can be difficult to prove the original location or cause of the infestation. An inspection can sometimes shine a helpful light on determining how long the bed bug issue has been there.

Many landlord / tenant relationships are able to come to a mutually agreed upon plan – It is in everyones’ best interest to get the bed bug problem treated!

 

Protecting Against Bed Bugs

To ensure your new apartment is free of bed bugs, do your research. Google search the management company or landlord, looking for any reviews by previous and current tenants, talk to your soon-to-be neighbors, and be aware of what to look for when you do a walk through of the apartment.

For landlords, talking to references and talking to your potential renters, as well as knowing what is going on in neighboring units, is key. Talk to former landlords if possible, to avoid repeat offenders!

Have an inspection done if you suspect anything. Do not expose your belongings to bed bugs, and do not move if you know you have bed bugs!  There are affordable, effective treatment options. Call us today! 216-544-8292

 

Learn about Ohio Pesticide Apartment Law 921.06 if you rent in or own a property with 4 or more units.

 

  1. Clayton Shroyer

    I live in a government subsidized building for the elderly. The tenant across the hall recently passed away of cancer, and I have known this family for the past 47 years. When his family tried moving his things after he passed away, they said his bedroom was infested with live bed bugs. We have had problems with bed bugs in the building quite a bit recently. Upon telling management that I believe is still infested, I was told that they had someone check it and the bed bugs were dead. I know this family and they would not lie about this. I am concerned as this apartment is now vacant and across the hall from me and they plan to do nothing about it! I have health problems myself with breathing, and I don’t want to get bed bugs in my apartment. And I don’t want to have to move either. And I certainly don’t want to be on anyone’s blacklist or evicted for bringing this up. What can I do about this?